In this issue

Regional Meetings Update

October 13 - Wood:  Lateral Design and Decks, at Cincinnati State, free event by USP/MiTek 8am and 1pm (info).

October 13 - A Structural Engineer's Guide to Landslides, at Terracon's office, free event by SEAoO + ASCE Geotech Cincinnati 5:30pm (info).

November 10 - Student Mentoring Night, details to come.

– Cincinnati Team Leader:
Walt Heckel, P.E.
Cincinnati@SEAoO.org

– Cincinnati Young Member Group:
Katt Dickert, E.I.
CinciYMG@SEAoO.org 

October 15:  Steel Deck Connections and Adhesive Anchors.  Craig Warner of Hilti will discuss the various factors that impact performance of steel deck attachments and adhesive anchors.  More info can be found HERE.  

November 19:  Vulcraft presentation on their EcoSpan floor system, with another presenter TBD.  Meeting will be held at the Parma library.  Registration will open soon. 

– Cleveland Team Leaders:
Mark A. Churpek, P.E.; Tim Gilbert, P.E., S.E.;  Jason Hoover, P.E., S.E.; Jared S. Perry, P.E.
Cleveland@SEAoO.org

Attention SEAoO Young Members - In an effort to better serve young engineers in Northeast Ohio, the young member groups from SEAoO and ASCE will be joining forces and cross-promoting various social and service events. If you would like to volunteer, or have questions or ideas, please contact Tyler Stillings at the email below.

– Cleveland Young Member Group:
Tyler Stillings, E.I.
CleveYMG@SEAoO.org

 SEAoO Columbus 

October 14:  Joint Associations' Happy Hour at High Line Car House.  Info can be found HERE.

October 15:  I-270/23 Interchange a.k.a "The Trench".  Joint lunchtime meeting with ASCE & ACI.  Info can be found HERE.

– Columbus Team Leader:
Matt Inkrott, P.E.
Columbus@SEAoO.org

October 14: High-Performance Steel Connection Requirements and Everyday Applications.  Learn about steel connection failures during the 1994 Northridge Earthquake and the resulting building code changes.  Testing and research has led to better insights for structures in any design criteria.  More info can be found HERE.

– Toledo Team Leader:
Dennis Birkemeier, P.E.
Toledo@SEAoO.org

October 14:  The Dayton group will hold its first meeting at TJ Chumps in Huber Heights.  Bruce Glidden from Elco Fasteners will present on Causes and Control of Fastener Failures. For more information click here.

There is NO CHARGE to attend this initial meeting, so join us for dinner and some good discussion. 

We are still looking for volunteers to contribute in any capacity as this newest SEAoO section gets started.  Please let us know if you're able to assist.

– Dayton Team Leader:
Mark Remmetter, P.E.
Dayton@SEAoO.org

Newsletter

Print
October 2015  

SEAoO News

Elections

The nomination period for SEAoO's annual election has closed.  This year's open positions are President-Elect, Secretary, and two Director positions.  The following will be on the ballot:  

President-elect:  Frank Monastra

Secretary:  Dennis Birkemeier

Director:  Matt Inkrott

Director:  Scott Bickel

Further biographical info on these candidates will be forthcoming, along with the ballot later this month.  Ballots will be sent via email to SEAoO's Professional Members.  

Note that Tim Gilbert will be SEAoO President in 2016, as voted last year.  

New SEAoO Dayton Section kicking off with FREE meeting

As mentioned in recent newsletters, our Dayton section is starting up and kicking off their Fall schedule  with a FREE dinner meeting on October 14th.  See this page for more details and registration.  If you're curious to see what SEAoO is about or looking to connect with other engineers in the area, please come on by.  

New Jobmart postings

The Jobmart is accessible to SEAoO members, and we offer this as a courtesy to our membership. Anyone can post positions, and there have been a number of new postings in the past few months.  Go to Member Area--JobMart to check it out. 

Back to top

SEAoO Annual Conference

Thank You for an Excellent Annual Conference

Last month SEAoO hosted our Annual Conference in Columbus, OH.  While we're still in the process of wrapping up all the final details to close the books on it, it seemed to be one of the best yet.  

Thank you to all who attended.  Your feedback helped us put our best foot forward and makes us want to achieve even more next year.

Thank you to our presenters.  This year again provided a wide range of design topics on various materials.  (Note that presentation slides will be posted in our Downloads area in the coming weeks.)

Thank you to our sponsors: Chicago ClampUSP Structural Connectors, and the Nucor Vulcraft Group.  Your support enabled us to provide the highest level offering yet for SEAoO.  We encourage all of our readers to visit your site to learn more about your products.

Thank you to our exhibitors.  The products and services you displayed helped the attendees learn about what is available for them to help serve their clients.   

Thank you to the students who presented their award winning papers.  You are the future leaders of our profession and we strive to help you make the transition as smoothly as possible.

And thank you to all of our members.  We strive to continue improving the event in hopes that it better meets your needs for education, building your professional network, supporting student transition to work and having a good time.  

Here's to an even better event in 2016!

Back to top

SEAoO Education Committee

Education Award Dinner - Thank You

The Basic Education Committee presented three awards for student papers at the annual Awards Dinner.  The Award Book containing the committee's year-end report and selected papers can be downloaded from our web page under About Us-Committees-Basic Education Committee (here).

We look forward to another great year ahead.  Student mentoring nights are coming up.  Please contact us to get involved.

Thank you,
Mindy Barber P.E., Chair-Educ@SEAoO.org

Back to top

SEAoO Licensure Committee

S. E. Licensure is Dealt an Obstacle at 2015 NCEES Annual Conference

In August, National Council of Examiners of Engineers and Surveyors, NCEES, narrowly failed to pass a motion to incorporate structural licensure into its model laws. The vote was very close; 31 for, 32 against and 6 abstentions.

 
Board Type For Against Abstain Total
PE Board  25  AK, AL, AR,CA, DC, DE, FL,
GA,HI, IA,IL, MS, MT, NM,
NV, OK, OR, SC, UT, VT,
WA, WY, GU, NMI, PR
 24  CO, ID, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD,
ME, MI, MO, NC, ND, NE, NH,
NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, SD, TN,
VA, WI, WV
  5   AZ, MA,
MN, TX
VI
54
SE Board 1 IL 0 -  0  - 1
Survey Board 5 DE, FL,IL, IN, VT 8 ME, MI, NE, NH,
RI, TN, TX, WV
 1  MD 14
Total 31 - 32 - 6 - 69

 

At first glance the total (69 votes) might seem odd. It comes from the structure of NCEES. Each of the 50 state licensing boards, as well as several other licensing boards, make up the NCEES membership; in addition to engineering boards, some states have separate boards for surveying and/or structural licensure. Each board may cast a vote.

This would have been a significant step towards wider implementation of structural licensure. And although the motion did not progress, it is encouraging to see how much support there is. Several of the states where the board or boards voted against the measure, including Ohio, have organizations advocating for the implementation of structural licensure. It is likely that the motion will appear again in the future.

Although NCEES recommendations or actions do not have the weight of law, they do serve as a basis for jurisdictions' adoption into laws and/or regulations. The Model Law can have a great influence on the development of each state’s laws and regulations.

The details of the narrowly defeated motion were discussed in the August newsletter and the full details of the motion are available here

Please contact us to share your thoughts or volunteer to support our efforts.

Timothy M. Gilbert, P.E., S.E. SECB
SEAoO Licensure Committee
Back to top

Nuts, Bolts & Washers

Boomers, X-ers, Millennials - All People

It's unusual for a day to go by without some headline proclaiming that millennials, generally those born between 1980 and 2000, are different in some fundamental way.  You have surely read or heard that they are more collaborative, more engaged, loyal to their own brand, have a sense of entitlement, et cetera.  To this I'll borrow a phrase from our friends in the UK: bollocks!

Surely, recent college graduates grew up with many different experiences that those of us with more "seasoning."  And while this can definitely provide a different perspective on technology and popular culture, it does not change the underlying nature of humanity.  A recent issue of The Economist provided a more thorough consideration and stated it much more eloquently than I could:

Every age group contains introverts and extroverts, high-flyers and low-riders. But they also need to recognise that human commonalities swamp both individual differences and generational variations. The most striking thing about the research data compiled by the likes of CEB and the Centre for Creative Leadership is how much workers of different generations have in common. They want roughly the same things regardless of when they were born...

We all work best when we are treated as individuals.  It benefits both us and those around us when we treat them as individuals rather than a member of a group whose members have the same characteristics.  Our nation has made great strides to overcome perspectives such as this for decades.  Let's continue to do so.

Wild Ride

For numerous reasons, amusement parks can be great fun for structural engineers.  Not only are the rides thrilling, we also get to see some amazing structures on display.  And the roller coaster tops the charts in both thrills and structural complexity.  And Ohio roller coaster fans are fortunate to have two parks featuring these engineering marvels: Cedar Point in Sandusky and Kings Island near Cincinnati.

Next year, Cedar Point will raise the bar once more with a new coaster set to break ten different world records. With the aid of 3D virtual reality software, the park released a video that lets the viewer experience the ride from the rider's perspective.  Not only does it give a first person virtual experience, but it lets the viewer "turn their head" by mouse action to look in different angles.  

This could be what's ahead for more structural engineering efforts.

If you get a chance to see or ride the new coaster next year, drop us a note to let us know what you think of it and the engineering behind it.

Tim Gilbert
SEAoO President-Elect

 

Back to top